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#104718 - 02/22/13 02:30 PM "scab" management
Michael Bono Offline

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 01/11/11
Posts: 3452
Loc: Santa Barbara, CA USA
My current patient was a total pleasure to work with. Nicely, he followed my post-treatment instructions to the letter (most guys don’t). The point I’m illustrating is how to mitigate post-treatment “scabs” even with heavy body hair and maximum treatment. First step, is to understand what a “scab” actually is! (The photos are before and a few days afterward … the exact time when scabs should have been seen in their "full glory.”)

When the follicle is treated (burned), chemical mediators are released from the mast cells that initiate the healing process. Blood vessels in the area become swollen and, consequently, white cells “leak out” into the area to start “cleaning up the job.”

Along with the white cells, blood serum leaks out (carrying with it clotting factors). In a deep follicle, the serum fills the follicle and collects at the skin’s surface … quickly forming a “scab.” Indeed a scab can, and usually, forms from a perfectly treated deep follicle. (The notion of “overtreatment of the epidermis is incorrect: but that’s another lengthy explanation). So, how to mitigate scabs? It’s all about water and keeping the area moist! A “scab” is “junk” … so wash off the junk!

Yes, we have all been taught to never wash with soap and water after a treatment. This goes against common treatment for burns. Anyway, I simply had this patient take a long warm bath every day after the treatment; he complied.

What happens here is that the “scab material” was washed (soaked) away and was unable to form. All of this speeds the ability for the epidermis to bridge the wound gap quickly. The bathing also allows accumulated “junk” (dead white cells and dead material) to NOT fill the follicle: so not pustules. At the appropriate time, I also had him scrum with a soft body brush. (After the bath, he takes a very light shower and washes with Hibiclens ... or other similar detergent ... to guard against infection.)

So, this patient got almost no pustules (even though he’s only 20-year-old) and scabs never formed at all. The bathing also helped in post-treatment pain. Ideally, the client would also use an oily material afterward (he did not). (Emu oil is excellent, but so is common Vaseline!) I suspect that the success of “Tea Tree Oil” is largely due to it’s oily nature. By keeping the wound moist, a “hard scab” will not form. It’s very difficult to “beat” good old “soap and water! (At the second “clearance, in 3 months, the client will see 50% reduction of the hair.)

I hope this helps!



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#104720 - 02/22/13 03:21 PM Re: "scab" management [Re: Michael Bono]
dfahey Offline

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 10/27/03
Posts: 9689
Loc: Columbus, Ohio
Superb work, Michael! mmmmm! Mmmmm! mmmm!

This is not as easy as it looks, folks, but just look at what the hands of master electrologist (and teacher) can do. This young man has got to be walking in the clouds everyday. Fantastic pictures that I know everybody loves seeing.

Thank you also for the wound healing explanation. It is always good to detail that part along with aftercare. My back guys tell me that they only use soap and water and the heal perfectly fine. They can't reach part of their back to apply anything, so they have to basically leave it alone. By the way, I love the smell of Hibiclens..

Do you care to reveal how many hours it took to achieve this miracle transformation? I suspect you used a Hinkel probe, as well?
_________________________
Dee Fahey, R.N., C.T.
Licensed by the State Medical Board of Ohio for Nursing license and Cosmetic Therapy/Electrolysis license
_____________________
ELECTROLYSIS FAQ'S:

British Institute & Association of Electrolysis

http://www.electrolysis.co.uk/?page_id=16

Do not give up, the beginning is always the hardest.

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#104723 - 02/22/13 03:36 PM Re: "scab" management [Re: dfahey]
Michael Bono Offline

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 01/11/11
Posts: 3452
Loc: Santa Barbara, CA USA
Hi Dee Dee ...

We're done (and so am I!). It took a total of 50 hours for full clearance of shoulders and back. This was an extreme case of super dense hair (I will post a photo of the upper back. I've never seen this density on the upper back ... ever!).

I charged him $70 per hour, so it was $3,500 (I reduce the rate for out-of-towners). The next clearance will cost him about $1,800 and the final about $900. Not exactly cheap ... but electrolysis always works and that's the beauty of it! Yes, "electrology rules!" he he he

Normally, it takes 40 hours for the average guy.

Yes, I used a standard "C" Hinkel tapered needle. (I only have a few dozen left of my "favorite" tapered. I'm beginning to panic!) I have a trip planned in a couple weeks and I'm hoping to get this company to make tapered needles ... in the right sizes! A taper does no good if the taper is riding high above the follicle! And, as I have see, that's now most people use the tapered needle. (I need to make a video of the proper useage ... I think I will.)

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#104726 - 02/22/13 04:28 PM Re: "scab" management [Re: Michael Bono]
Gretchen0b Offline

Major Contributor

Registered: 04/01/12
Posts: 124
Loc: Colorado
I would like to see that video.
_________________________
Kill'em All and let your electrologist sort them out. \m/

www.pcelectrolysis.com

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#104729 - 02/22/13 08:20 PM Re: "scab" management [Re: Gretchen0b]
fenix Offline
Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 03/17/12
Posts: 521
Michael, I'm not surprised that this 20 year old has so much dense body hair. I had friends in high school from Caucuses and "Greater Middle East" backgrounds. These guys had upper back, shoulder, upper arm hair development at 18!
At least this guy doesn't have to worry about needing much "touch up" work later in his adult years, because there is no way you can expect more hair development with dense hair present already. smile

Amazing job!

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#104730 - 02/22/13 09:19 PM Re: "scab" management [Re: fenix]
Danika Offline
Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 01/06/12
Posts: 476
BEAUTIFUL WORK! Man, I hope YOUR back is doing well after working so hard on the clients back . Your description to keep the area moist confirms what my skin always seems to ache for following treatment! Good to know. A video from you would be fabulous!

One question related to scabs...the last session on my face , (with the new electrolysist I found here ,who I really like :)) , she tried an insulated probe for the first time and it was more comfortable and I had way less reaction, and NO scabs. Does no scabs mean that it wasn't strong enough to have the "kill" one is aiming for ? By the way I dont ask these questions in any way to "mico manage" my sessions. In fact I get along very well with my Electrolysists . We may talk about some of this info. IF they are interested, and generally we have some great, far ranging discussions. I ask simply because I enjoy learning more about this area and i am interested...enquiring mind i guess...


Edited by Danika (02/22/13 09:27 PM)
_________________________
Female- Light skin, brown/blonde hair.
LASER- over 1+yr. Pleasantly surprised with results. No future sessions. Need to live with/in sun.
ELECTROLYSIS- Scammed by the one in my town. Whenever possible, while traveling out of town,I try to get electrolysis on face. Very Challenging overall due to lack of professionals available .Many treatments done on only a tiny area of my face yet there still seems to be alot of hair growing there. Seems an impossible dream at this point frown




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#104732 - 02/22/13 09:57 PM Re: "scab" management [Re: Danika]
granolaprincess Offline
Contributor

Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 44
Good question, Danika. I'm wondering that too. I had my first long facial appointment on Tuesday, and I still have red marks all over, though the scabs are not developing as I thought they would. I've been keeping it moisturized with coconut oil, and maybe that's helping? Between the moisture factor and the fact that coconut oil has so many lovely healing and anti-bacterial functions for skin application . . . Still, wondering if putting up with some noticeable skin reaction in the days following treatment may mean that the treatment is more effective. I know Dee isn't on board with lasting visible facial reactions, and I didn't know if that was for any other reason besides the fact that it doesn't look good. But I've been looking bad for years with facial hair. I'm used to looking bad. frown If some scabbing/redness means that effective treatment is going on, I can put up with it in the short term.

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#104734 - 02/23/13 01:28 AM Re: "scab" management [Re: granolaprincess]
dfahey Offline

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 10/27/03
Posts: 9689
Loc: Columbus, Ohio
I say this with all honesty, a skin reaction without scabbing is not a worthless treatment. Keeping the current action at the proper depth in the follicle and limiting the amount of energy that comes to the surface of the skin is possible. I do not have highly visible scabbing as a side effect on my facial cases, no matter how long I work on the face or how large or small the hair structures are. Sometimes there are a few pinpoint scabs, but they are hardly noticeable. For long first clearances, swelling is the main side effect, not scabs, but the swelling disappears in about three days or less.

For body work, sometimes there is no scabbing, but most of the time, there are pinpoint scabs to medium size scabs. Again, no big deal. Scabs are okay. When there are no scabs, gosh, I must be doing something right because I am finishing people within that 9-12-14-18 month timeframe. So, the degree of scabbing does not relate to kill rate.

I mainly use Laurier IBP probes now, but before that, I was, am still am, a big fan of Ballet Gold probes. Either way, with either probe, I can keep scabbing to a bare minimum or not at all. I have talked to other electrologists that report the same thing in their practices. They don't get much scabbing either.

Scabbing is not a red flag, grab your heart situation. When scabbing occurs, it will heal fine. I prefer to make it my personal goal, not to cause unsightly scabbing if I possibly can and I usually can. Probe choice helps. Understanding what your epilator can do helps. Careful insertions along with choosing the right balance of intensity and timing levels helps. Good magnification helps. Aftercare choices and aftercare behaviors help. If you have a lot of scabbing, that does not equate with a better "kill" rate. It just doesn't! I say that with total and passionate honesty.

Now about that coconut oil. I am nuts over coconut oil! I bought a beautiful jar from Trader Joe's last week and I use it on my skin. MY GOD! What a gem of nature ! I may be trying some as aftercare on my clients skin. I am now rubbing it on my over washed winter hands before I don my gloves before a treatment. My skin is lovely. I eat it as well, just a teaspoon a day, thanks to my food guru friend in Buffalo grin I am so glad you mentioned coconut oil. It's all I can talk about these days!

_________________________
Dee Fahey, R.N., C.T.
Licensed by the State Medical Board of Ohio for Nursing license and Cosmetic Therapy/Electrolysis license
_____________________
ELECTROLYSIS FAQ'S:

British Institute & Association of Electrolysis

http://www.electrolysis.co.uk/?page_id=16

Do not give up, the beginning is always the hardest.

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#104735 - 02/23/13 02:26 AM Re: "scab" management [Re: dfahey]
granolaprincess Offline
Contributor

Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 44
Boy, I wish I lived closer to one of you experts. I have so much anxiety about finding someone who will be able to do an effective job with the least amount of appointments. I keep hearing how important it is to find a good practitioner, and it scares me because I don't know how to tell when I've found a good one!

I love coconut oil so much. For about a billion things. It seems like the perfect aftercare item. I'm kinda surprised it hasn't come up before. It's kinda my answer to everything these days. wink

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#104736 - 02/23/13 02:27 AM Re: "scab" management [Re: granolaprincess]
granolaprincess Offline
Contributor

Registered: 11/29/12
Posts: 44
Would an electrologist take offense to me asking what probes they used? I mean, I'd hate to sound like a "I read about it on the internet, so I know everything now" sort of person. And is a suggestion of a probe change a faux pas?

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