Subscribe & Support This Site!
consumer hair removal forum
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
Rate This Topic
Hop To:
#125653 - 01/16/18 04:06 PM Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend?
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
A little background: I am pale with sensitive, clog prone and acne prone on my chin (mainly due to the hair). I had laser hair removal on my chin years ago which only caused more hair. For years I have been tweezing. I tried electrolysis years ago and gave up because it didn't work and gave me icepick scars. Most of the hair is coming in white and is very thick, course and deeply rooted.

I have recently begun electrolysis. She is using thermolysis and I have had 4 or 5 sessions. During the session occasionally I hear the popping sound (crackle). I noticed like the last time I got electroysis she really has to tug on some of the hairs to get them out.

Afterwards I am a little swollen but otherwise ok. After several hours I get pimples that are worse than any breakout ever. They are more like pustules or cysts. I have done my best to heal the skin between sessions not wearing makeup and occasionally even applying Calamine lotion. Is this normal. I expressed to the operator who has 20 or more years experience and is a nurse that I was concerned that after several months I would be experiencing no permanent removal. She assured me that she can do it and that it is normal and some of the hairs and follicles are curved (I am prone to this and ingrown hairs).

Should I keep going or switch to someone who uses blend or galvanic? I have been keeping a low profile since my skin is a mess, but I have a 7 year old and can't be a hermit while I go through this. Depressing!

Top
Thread Sponsors
#125654 - 01/16/18 06:12 PM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
Iluv2zap Offline
Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 11/19/14
Posts: 1330
Gosh, where to start with this one. Well, I guess by shooting down some of the obvious misconceptions on your part. This is normal to be mislead by some concepts that havent been communicated to you or understood by you.No one starts with all the information, and trying to learn while dealing with your brains anxiety over things like "skin damage" and effectiveness can cause a lot of stress, and that in turn causes you to misconstrue what you are seeing. So all this to say, dont take what I'm about to say personally, it's meant to help you.

I'll start with this gem:

"I tried electrolysis years ago and gave up because it didn't work and gave me icepick scars." combined with this:
" I am pale with sensitive, clog prone and acne prone on my chin (mainly due to the hair)."


No, it didnt. Here's a mild example of ice pick scarring I found on google:
https://www.lipstickalley.com/proxy.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fei.realself.com%2Ffull%2Fb05cd4e2f7e31f6107e0258d734a17cc%2F546111-
544570.jpg&hash=e53550794a25d2630efc26cd6e1a338e

and here another:
https://static.acne.org/ipb_uploads/mont...b01949be37f.jpg

Ice pick scars Google Ice pick scars and go to images . What you see are lots of images of scars and pock marks that look like someone stuck an ice pick into the skin. It's very logical then to imaging that an electrolysis probe inserted into a hair and burned the surrounding tissue would cause this kind of mark. In the brain, this seems to make sense. Except for that that little pesky thing, the difference between theory and fact.What is the thing I can almost hear Michael Bono saying.

Ice pick scars develop because the pore of the follicle is held open over a large amount of time, long enough that the skin begins to lose its elasticity and is unable to return to it's normal size. Electrolysis probes are fine,about the size of the hair, and cannot stretch out the follicle in this manner. They also are in the follicle for a very short period, not long enough to stretch out the follicle in this way. The reaction to a burn from thermolysis or lye does not cause the skin to lose it's elasticity in that way.

So what does cause the follicle to be held open for that period such that it loses it's ability to return to it's normal size? In all cases ice pick scars are caused by cystic acne.In every single case.

next up: " I had laser hair removal on my chin years ago which only caused more hair. For years I have been tweezing"


Of the two assertions here, the tweezing is more likely in your case to be the cause of the course growth and ingrowns. I think there are other contributing factors however.

next: "I have recently begun electrolysis. She is using thermolysis and I have had 4 or 5 sessions. During the session occasionally I hear the popping sound (crackle). I noticed like the last time I got electroysis she really has to tug on some of the hairs to get them out. "


The crackle is called high frequency blowout. It can happen on rare occasion by accident, but consistently would indicate an issue with power levels or depth of insertion. Tugging would indicate insufficient and ineffective treatment.

and finally: "Afterwards I am a little swollen but otherwise ok. After several hours I get pimples that are worse than any breakout ever. They are more like pustules or cysts. I have done my best to heal the skin between sessions not wearing makeup and occasionally even applying Calamine lotion. Is this normal. I expressed to the operator who has 20 or more years experience and is a nurse that I was concerned that after several months I would be experiencing no permanent removal. She assured me that she can do it and that it is normal and some of the hairs and follicles are curved (I am prone to this and ingrown hairs). "

the infamous "wall of whiteheads" is caused by contamination by some substance or could be related to a metalurgical allergy. I would NOT use the calamine lotion.You should use NO PRODUCT in the24 hours post trreatment. I recommend cleansing with cool water a few times a day, and ceasing makeup , suntan lotion, or facial scrubs during this period.If after cleansing, using no product whatsoever and still seeing these type of cysts, I would recommend a gold probe be used for treatment. It's not unheard of, that allergies to the nickle in stainless steel can cause a histimine reaction.And of course your electrologist should be wearing gloves.I'd be very surprised if a nurse would not be anyway.


Alright, so now I'd like to sum up what I'm thinking from your case and description.
First, modality is not going to make a tremendous amount of difference. The correct modality, is the one your electrologist is most proficient in. They all kill hair, they all leave perfect skin.
What I suspect from your description and alluded to briefly previously is, *drumroll*.............I believe it likely you have a hormonal imbalance.What's telling me this is your skins sensativity to acne, and excess hair, in combination with the hair. This is most commonly caused by an excess of di-hydra-testosterone in the blood stream. This can be genetic, but is also often caused by diet or conditions such as cushings disease, thyroid issues, or polycystic ovarian syndrome. In almost all cases where I see these 2 items combined, I refer the client over to their family doctor to have their levels checked with a blood test. When they are indeed high, often the doctors will recommend a ultrasound to check for ovarian cysts.
The reason it's important to check on this is it will affect your hair removal. If a hormonal imbalance is present and isnt addressed, new follicles can continue to be stimulated into hair-bearing long after the treatment should have been finished.

Your question amounts not so much to what modality should I be using, but should I be continuing with my present electrologist. Or should you try another and compare differences.Given the occasional high frequency blowout, the tugging. and the continued issues with contamination of the area, and also given that I believe it's a good idea to ALWAYS try out as many as you can and choose the one whose treatment you like best'm going to say yeas it's worth while. This is not to say your electrologist is doing anything wrong, but it is worthwhile on the basis of having an objective point of view.As for what modality they use, it honestly does not make a difference.


Seana
_________________________
Seana Richmond
Certified Electrologist.
Electrolysis By Seana
http://electrolysisbyseana.com

Top
#125655 - 01/16/18 07:35 PM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
It was unlike anything I have ever experienced. The bumps were in some cases like bubbles and I could feel the pressure (I won't go into gory detail). That didn't happen when I had electrolysis previously so I don't think it is allergy. She does wear gloves.

I have gotten a blood test twice because of the hair growth and both times they claim the hormone levels are "normal". I try not to be a vain person, but how do people deal with the course beard hair and a face that looks like a war zone between treatments with no makeup while still maintaining their normal life? There are not a lot of options where I live, but there are a couple listed in the directory on this site that I could try. I have a feeling this current electrologist might be offended but this is a lot of time money and pain to go through and I want it to work.

Top
#125658 - 01/17/18 11:06 AM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
Iluv2zap Offline
Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 11/19/14
Posts: 1330
Try having a gold needle used anyway. Often allergic reactions develop over time. I didnt used to get hives every time I washed clothes or bedding in commercial laundry detergent, but I definitely do now.The veracity of the reaction though, does sound like a potential histimine reaction.

I often find medical professionals are hesitant to diagnose a hormonal issue. Often this is because they know the hormone balance can change, also the "normal levels " of androgens in the bloodstream are a very broad range. It helps, to ask for a number from the test. If it's zero ( never is) then there truly is not an androgen issue but you can still experience genetic growth.

As for how do people survive? The worst of the skin reaction is usually at the beginning of the process . As a rule, the skin quality improves throughout treatment.

I recently started a case on a early 20's transwoman. This person is not out to their family, and has never been on HRT . Due to their youg age the beard was not advanced, but it was still significant. Most importantly they had never plucked, never done laser . I worked efficiently at the rate of an hour a week for 8 weeks to remove the hair. I removed a LOT of hair in short order. And yes, the first few times I threated them their skin looked a little "beat up" at the end of treatment. That 8 weeks I made steady progress and I was able to clear their face completely this past sunday for the second time ( the first was just before christmas when they went home for 3 weeks) . As of now, every treatment between now and the end of semester for this student, the goal is to keep removing the hair. But the skin is no longer "beat up " looking. Even in this 3 month period, the clients skin has transitioned from significant skin reactions, to almost none at all.Such is the way treatment goes! Also I will note that the majority of the skin reaction is from the hair itself, not the electrolysis treatment.This is why the skin quality improves over treatment, because the amount of hair causing the disruption decreases!

Believe in your skins ability to heal. Do review the following skin healing series published by Michael Bono. It can go a long way to alleviating your fears:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viKQcBAHLOI&list=PLeYuCaeN4D7PpsKYHFJ7tKr0yJoIyTSQO

Seana


Edited by Iluv2zap (01/17/18 11:09 AM)
_________________________
Seana Richmond
Certified Electrologist.
Electrolysis By Seana
http://electrolysisbyseana.com

Top
#125659 - 01/17/18 03:20 PM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
Thanks Seana, I feel better after reading this. The electrologist told me to be patient and get something called dermaseptic made for after treatments.

Top
#125664 - 01/19/18 08:04 AM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
Scurvy Offline
Member

Registered: 11/12/14
Posts: 9
I would be curious to see an image before and after treatment. After my first few treatments, the condition of my skin was very poor and noticeably so. After roughly two months of treatments, I still have a reaction though not to the same extent as before, and my skin returns almost to normal within a few days. I expect it will only get better from here.

Top
#125665 - 01/19/18 10:01 AM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
I have somewhat good news to report. I tried another electrologist and did not have the same reaction at all. The original electrologist used a high tech looking Apilus. This electrologist uses what looks like a much older low tech Proteus EP-2000. I should have asked her what settings she used. She really took her time and said that many of my hairs vary in length, diameter, etc. Crossing my fingers that her treatment is effective. I am just thrilled for now that I didn't have the reaction I had before. I woke up with one pimple, and one scab and that is it.

Top
#125666 - 01/19/18 10:03 AM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
This current electrolysis also said that it may take as long as a year to achieve permanent removal. Sadly, she is significantly more expensive than the previous and more expensive than anyone else that I have looked up.

Top
#125667 - 01/19/18 10:06 AM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
This current electrolysis also said that it may take as long as a year to achieve permanent removal. Sadly, she is significantly more expensive than the previous and more expensive than anyone else that I have looked up.

Top
#125669 - 01/19/18 10:11 AM Re: Advice: Should I switch to someone who uses blend? [Re: endlesshello]
endlesshello Offline
Contributor

Registered: 01/16/18
Posts: 17
Oh, one more thing, sadly she also had to tug on the hairs to get them out, but she did seem to think she was getting good epilation and showed me the hair with the sheath intact. The hairs are very stubborn.

Top
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >

Moderator:  Andrea 
Sponsored Links
Recent Posts
Electrolysis Help
by Iluv2zap
Today at 11:23 AM
Japanese IME HR-5000
by Laurier
Today at 08:59 AM
Skin issues
by zapmyface
Yesterday at 08:50 PM
Newbie journey
by MrsV
Yesterday at 02:19 PM
Does this look right? Clean N Easy Deluxe aftermat
by 1876Eeyore
Yesterday at 01:47 PM
Top Posters
LAgirl 9994
dfahey 9664
James W. Walker VII 8055
Andrea 4149
Michael Bono 3299
Who's Online
2 registered (atticusfata, 1 invisible), 128 Guests and 2 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod