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#125687 - 01/21/18 12:05 PM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
Scurvy Offline
Contributor

Registered: 11/12/14
Posts: 30
Australia is desperate for competent and committed electrologists, so I feel your business here would not be unwelcome. It's not possible to officially study electrolysis here to the extent it is in North America, and of the few electrologists that practice here, only a minority offer treatments longer than 30 minutes. One in my city even refuses to serve men or trans clients which is appalling for several reasons. Unfortunately, the skilled electrologists don't capitalise on their value and spread the good word about permanent hair removal -- so everyone just goes to laser clinics.

I've really been flirting with the idea of learning how to do it and offering services part-time. I've found someone willing to train me, and I'm on the look out for an affordable pre-owned epilator.

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#125688 - 01/21/18 01:03 PM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
Iluv2zap Offline
Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 11/19/14
Posts: 1548
Unfortunately I wasnt serious about heading down under. I'm aware of the issue with getting electrologists in australia, having contacted Christine O'Connell a few times on clients behalf in an attempt to find someone to serve my abroad clients, and she has filled me in pretty much on the availability aspects.

If you do decide to do this, I wish you the best of luck.Despite the first year financial blues, I'm continuing for the moment to make a go of it here.If you do decide to start electrology in austrailia, then I recommend a lot of research into cost/availability of supplies like probes/epilators/sterilizers etc. If electrology is that hard to access there, it's unlikely there will be an easily accessible supply.


Edited by Iluv2zap (01/21/18 01:05 PM)
_________________________
Seana Richmond
Certified Electrologist.
Electrolysis By Seana
http://electrolysisbyseana.com

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#125700 - 01/25/18 05:04 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
KLR71 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/23/17
Posts: 9
Do machines auto compensate for energy levels? I've been having my upper lip worked on for a couple months now and the releases often hurt. My operator knows about expecting to see sheaths and papillae (is that the plural?) but the releases on my upper lip have been stinging anyway - I assume because the skin is so tender in the first place. Is that a common response with this area? It seems kind of like quasi tweezing. Things are a lot thinner now there so we're making progress, but the tweezing feeling worries me anyway. When we go back down to my chin the hairs pop out with a lot less of a sting. I plan to go to some other operators for free consultations and see if the pain level is lower, among other things.


Edited by KLR71 (01/25/18 05:06 AM)
_________________________
Lucy Ross, transwoman

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#125701 - 01/25/18 11:07 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
Iluv2zap Offline
Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 11/19/14
Posts: 1548
the upper lip is about the most sensative place on the face to have electrolysis done. Often I have to pause to allow clients time to sneeze because it generates this type of sensation.

In a lot of cases, electrologists resort to flash thermolysis to destroy upper lip hair. If the energy is insufficient,then the hair will feel like it's plucked, and the follicle will generate another hair after. However if the energy is sufficient, the hair will release just fine .

My friend Josepha recently commented to me, that she doesnt target the Dermal Papillae. At all. Instewad she targets the hairs germanation cells in the bulge. The follicles of her clients DO NOT generate another hair.It seems that destroying the stem cells, is sufficient to have this effect.

If the hair on your lip is thinning consistently, then this is good news! I find that upper lis can go from start point, to completion, in 9-12 months with consistent treatment.

Trying out another operator is an awesome idea,one I normally recommend for everyone. But I would not use comfort as my measure of effectiveness, far from it. If the hairs are feeling like a pluck consistently, and the electrolysis also more comfortable, these are two key signs that the electrologist is not using sufficient amounts of energy to destroy the hair. Some are taught to pluck in order to give a favourable skin reaction, which is totally the wrong approach and will extend your treatment, possibly indefinitely.

As for the machine self adjusting, no this is not the case. The machine settings are set by the operator, according to the body area and type of hair. the machine des not change these settings on its own without operator intervention It does choose the enegy modulation from the parameters you choose (probe type, size, body area, hair thickness).
_________________________
Seana Richmond
Certified Electrologist.
Electrolysis By Seana
http://electrolysisbyseana.com

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#125703 - 01/25/18 11:30 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
Michael Bono Online

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 01/11/11
Posts: 3513
Loc: Santa Barbara, CA USA
Recovering from surgery, I'm still sort of blind ... ugh.

A lot of work has to be done, re: "the papilla." A papilla, by definition, is a nipple; but most electrologists think it's a blood vessel. Furthermore, a papilla (and it's embedded capillary loop) is not unique to a hair follicle, as there are billions of them that "feed" the epidermis. (That's why the top layer of the dermis is called the "papillary dermis.")

We all got off subject because of simple misinterpreted observation, but data accumulated over the last few decades trashes the "papilla only" and the related "anagen only" mythology.

Oh yeah, what the client posted is not possible: that the electrologist was "looking for the papilla attached to the epilated hair." In my entire career, I have only seen the capillary loop epilate with the hair about three times! There were reasons for that ... but too long a story for these Hairtell "snippets."

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#125704 - 01/25/18 11:49 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
Michael Bono Online

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 01/11/11
Posts: 3513
Loc: Santa Barbara, CA USA
Here's another "juicy clue."

In William Montagna's landmark book on the skin, he states (I'm paraphrasing) that when follicles develop in the unborn baby, they arise from a "knot" of stem cells in the epidermis (only). These cells then channel downward, "pick up" a blood vessel and form a hair and follicle.

He goes on to state (and here's the "kicker"), that returning hairs (that is new anagen hairs developing in the adult human) form EXACTLY as they did in the fetus. The new anagen hair arises from stem cells in the epidermis and grow upward and downward as they did in the developing human baby.

Jossie targets stem cells and so do I. Actually, electrologists are already targeting stem cells, they just aren't (largely) aware of it. Can a hair follicle develop without a papilla? Actually YES! And, given the entire human population, it happens trillions of times per minute (second ?).

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#125707 - 01/25/18 09:49 PM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
KLR71 Offline
Member

Registered: 05/23/17
Posts: 9
Thanks for replying guys, especially Michael for going to the trouble during your convalescence. Apologies for the imprecise terminology, would it better to say that we want to see the intact hair bulb come out? I'm more informed than your average electrolysis customer I'd imagine, but am still a mere layperson.

Some machines have a feature labeled Autosensor or the like - what does that do?

Are some people cursed with larger than average bulb sizes? I've wondered if this is why my hairs don't just cleanly release all the time. Not that my operator thinks this is true in my case - she did say I have exceptionally cooperative hair, and very sparse to boot, so I'm lucky in this regard. Still, when I think about how 2 months of work is what it's taken to come close to (I hope) clear my lip forever, and then look at the acres of stubble we still have to go through, it's frustrating/worrisome.

She ought to be able to tell if she's really just tweezing things, after all. BTW my skin is in pretty good shape after each session. I had a swollen lump for days after my first go round with her, she dialed things down after that and moved around more, or did before I told her I wanted her to concentrate on my upper lip.
_________________________
Lucy Ross, transwoman

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#125708 - 01/26/18 02:29 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
MelB77 Offline
Contributor

Registered: 09/08/17
Posts: 13
Shame you were joking about coming to Australia Seana, we definitely need more expert electrologists in Oz! Especially Melbourne..

I think it takes longer than 2 months to clear upper lip permanently? My daughter has been getting treatment for about 4 months on lip and chin/neck area and it’s looking really good but the hair is still coming through albeit less. I expect it will take a few more months still. It is a slow process but worth it.

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#125709 - 01/26/18 11:05 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Janedel62]
Deedra Offline

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 08/02/18
Posts: 9726
Loc: United States
It takes 9? 12? 18? months to permanently affect hair from any area that you are concentrating on , that is, if you are clearing the area every time you see a client.

So, if an upper lip is cleared of all bothersome hair every time one has a session, that translates into 8 - 15 sessions, spread out over 9? !2? 18? months. The middle part usually lags behind because it needs to be thinned rather than cleared. That area is sensitive and clients can only take so much.
_________________________
Dee Fahey RN CT LLC

Licensed by the State Medical Board of Ohio for Cosmetic Therapy/Electrolysis and the State Nursing Board of Ohio

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#125710 - 01/26/18 11:07 AM Re: A Tale of Two Electrolygists [Re: Michael Bono]
Deedra Offline

Top 10 Contributor

Registered: 08/02/18
Posts: 9726
Loc: United States
Originally Posted By Michael Bono
Here's another "juicy clue."

In William Montagna's landmark book on the skin, he states (I'm paraphrasing) that when follicles develop in the unborn baby, they arise from a "knot" of stem cells in the epidermis (only). These cells then channel downward, "pick up" a blood vessel and form a hair and follicle.

He goes on to state (and here's the "kicker"), that returning hairs (that is new anagen hairs developing in the adult human) form EXACTLY as they did in the fetus. The new anagen hair arises from stem cells in the epidermis and grow upward and downward as they did in the developing human baby.

Jossie targets stem cells and so do I. Actually, electrologists are already targeting stem cells, they just aren't (largely) aware of it. Can a hair follicle develop without a papilla? Actually YES! And, given the entire human population, it happens trillions of times per minute (second ?).


I love this post MIchael! Thank you!!
_________________________
Dee Fahey RN CT LLC

Licensed by the State Medical Board of Ohio for Cosmetic Therapy/Electrolysis and the State Nursing Board of Ohio

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